Tech Savvy

As busy professionals, we are constantly looking to squeeze a few extra minutes out of the day, increase our productivity, and just generally get more done. Time is our most valuable resource and no matter how wealthy you are; you can’t create or buy more of it.

Yet we are not without options. What you can do is use tools that streamline and ease the mundane. Consistency is the organized person’s friend. The more you can do to lessen the amount of time spent on the routine tasking, the more time you can spend on the strategic. This is nothing new, there are hundreds of books written on the subject and organizational experts who can help you (I’ve got a great organizer if you need one!). But what’s surprising is how often this advice isn’t heeded. When we step into a company, there is a hodgepodge of processes (or lack of processes) that are taking place. We know what is supposed to occur but more often than not the buck is passed down the line and eventually falls through the cracks. When companies employ appropriate tools to support common tasks they can move more quickly to meeting their goals.

Owners have to embrace technology and all it has to offer to optimize efficiency. Utilize the options available. There’s no excuse for using paper timesheets if you have more than 5 people. You need to have a document repository for your contracts, proposals and accounting files. Figure out what works for your company – DropboxSharePointGoogle Docs, etc. Invest in using a CRM tool from the beginning and there’s a lot less excel spreadsheet tracking (and finger pointing on updates). Understand the importance of moving to an online accounting system that will grow and scale with your organization. There are many inexpensive or even (mostly) free options that will allow you to save time and energy, allowing you to focus on what’s important – Growth.

As a CEO who does a lot more at stoplights while traveling between meetings than she’d like to admit, having the right technology at your hand is vital. If you aren’t out there as CEO growing your company, your growth will be stunted. Utilizing technology for consistency and efficiency will help you meet your goals. Just remember to balance. You own the technology, it doesn’t own you.

If you’d like to discuss further any of the tools that help to save the BOOST team precious time, let us know! www.BOOSTLLC.net.

Gut

“Have faith in your intuition and listen to your gut feeling.” Ann Cotton

Ask any CEO, and 90%+ will tell you that their biggest hurdle is people. Hiring the right team, making sure they play well together in the sandbox, work together to meet the mission, and generally push the company forward. The dynamics of a strong, diverse team are invaluable in the progression of your company. So how do you hire the right person? Do you rely on proven experience, or do you go with your gut?

There is plenty of written work around the topic of hiring. Some companies have it down to a science (think alphabet or apple). Most small businesses are lucky to have a standard process, much less something that is consistent and does a good job of screening candidates. Many folks at this stage “go with your gut” and hire specifically based on personality and how the candidate did in the interview.

How effective is this and how detrimental can it be to your company should your gut be off? Depending on your policies, you may be required to excessively retrain, mentor and closely monitor a subpar new hire. The damage to your established team could be expensive regarding time, mindset and resources.

For me, some of my best hires have been based on a combination of experience and/or the right personality traits. The right balance between the two is paramount. For example, is your accounting candidate detailed oriented? Do they have typos on their resume? If so, not a good indicator. I’ve hired folks without any specific industry experience, but they had the right personality and were willing to learn. Personality is just as important as any experience, especially when joining a small team. How well candidates can play with others is one of the key factors, and in my opinion, should be weighed more heavily than experience.

With that said, another key factor when considering a new hire is diversity, specifically, diversity of thought and opinion. If you surround yourself with folks who have the exact same background and exact same experience as you, you’ll wind up with total agreement, and stagnation. Total agreement doesn’t challenge you as a CEO, nor does it advance your company.  You need people on your team who will appropriately question your path, question the standard and most importantly, take issue with the soul-wrenching, “but we’ve always done it this way.” Hire folks that push you to be a stronger business leader, and your company will be much improved as a result.

Your gut is an important part of your hiring process as we often notice red flags subconsciously. Yet it behooves us to remember to include careful consideration of experience, personality, and diversity. While you’re refining your hiring process, you may want to consider a hiring audition to uncover some candidate characteristics often unseen in an interview. If you’re interested in revamping your policy on hiring, seek out the advice experts in your field as what may work for Apple may not work for you.

For expertise in GovCon regarding hiring, recruiting and human resources, contact BOOST LLC. www.BOOSTLLC.net

GovCon Voices: A Culture of Compliance

As seen on SmallGovCon.com

When we talk about the federal contracting industry, one of the first things that comes to mind is compliance. We are an overly regulated industry with a ton of laws to abide by, FAR changes to keep up with, legislation of which we need to stay on top. None of it is particularly easy or straightforward, and it sometimes takes experts to keep your organization in compliance. In short, no one can claim they are 100% compliant, nor can they claim to know everything with regards to this industry, especially a GovCon CEO. That’s the bad news.

The good news is that no one expects this of the CEO. However, your attitude towards compliance goes a long way within the organization. The example you set at the top will filter throughout the organization and will go a long way towards establishing and maintaining a company culture that follows the rules of this industry. We all talk about making sure that the company is not on the front page of the Washington Post for getting into hot water with the law or for debarment.

How can you contribute to that as a CEO?
How can you build your organization to take it seriously?
How do you keep from bogging down the wheels of progress and allow the mission goals for you and your clients to be met?

Lead by Example. It sounds so easy, is in every leadership book, and is touted on every trending article on LinkedIn. But ask yourself, who fills out your timesheet? Do you throw 8 hours of your time into G&A and call it a day? Do you have your admin fill out your timesheet? Do you approve your direct reports? Every GovCon has a timekeeping system that requires daily input and ultimately, signature submission and approval of direct reports time.
Do you travel according to JTRs and/or within the per diem rates? Do you expect your folks to abide accordingly? As a GovCon, you just don’t travel extravagantly. Ever.

Put your Money where your Mouth is.  How many emails from the Timekeeping Goon have you received? Do you ever take the time to find out who the repeat offenders are and to speak with them about these transgressions? Ever told your top sales person that they could have their pay docked or lose their jobs if they continue to be non-compliant? It’s that type of discussion (and action) that shows that the company values compliance and takes it seriously.

Have you had your HR folks scrub through your labor categories and the folks associated with them…proactively? Have you righted any salary discrepancies to ensure that your workforce is fairly and consistently paid according to skill set and experience? These suggestions all are dictated by FAR compliance and laws, but in general, they emulate good advice.

Be the leader that the GovCon industry needs and keep your company on the front pages for the work you are contributing to this country; not for running afoul of the rules.

See the original article: http://smallgovcon.com/govcon-voices/govcon-voices-a-culture-of-compliance/#sthash.4Ahp75Xd.dpuf