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DCAA Compliance for Small Businesses

As a small govcon have you ever thought…do I really need to be DCAA compliant? What if I’m “just a subcontractor” or “too small that DCAA will never notice me”?
We hear the following from companies more often then they’d like to admit:

  • It’s so complicated to get DCAA compliant (insert the eye roll and swipe across the forehead)
  • It’s such as hassle, I’ll do it when we get bigger (the procrastinator)
  • I have both commercial and government business, so the govcon piece won’t get noticed (I’m awesome and therefore the rules don’t apply)
  • It’s too expensive (cheap catches up to you)
  • I only have FFP and T&M contracts, so I won’t get audited (wrong!)
  • If I fail an audit, I’ll get excused because I’m a small business (nope, the small business card doesn’t work with DCAA)

To these “excuses” our advice is…

Get DCAA compliant and now!

Here’s why:

• It’s not as complicated as what you think.
There four primary components to being DCAA compliant – chart of accounts, timekeeping, forward pricing and policies and procedures. No one accounting system is deemed DCAA compliant.  It’s all about how your system is configured and your policies and procedures. A professional firm who knows DCAA compliant accounting is necessary to get the work done right…the first time.

• Small = less $ to become compliant.
Design a system that scales with you and the savings will be impressive. Retrofitting a large existing system to be DCAA compliant is time consuming and expensive.  Don’t get lazy – get it done when you are small.

• It’s a Pass/Fail test.
The is no B or C grade. You either pass or you fail.  Failing costs money and more money than it takes to preemptively become DCAA compliant.

• Timekeeping is like eating healthy.
It’s all about behavior modification. It takes daily reminders to establish healthy eating habits and it is the same for timekeeping. Additionally, it’s the most critical component of the DCAA audit.  Establishing solid policies and procedures for timekeeping when you are small is the easiest way to establish behaviors and set the tone for the critical importance of timekeeping.  Get HR involved because timekeeping should be in your employee handbook.  Educate employees on why timekeeping is important.

• Improve your dating profile.
Teaming partners, especially large integrators, like to work with small businesses that are DCAA compliant. You might not have been audited yet, but you are prepared in case you do and that is half of the battle.

Bottom line – get DCAA compliant now!
BOOST can help and it’s one of our favorite accounting projects. Well, we have lots of favorites, but this one is rewarding and we actually like doing it!  So, now go get healthy, change your behavior, spend some money in order to save some money and prepare for the inevitable.

What is a CPSR and Why Should You Care?

We recently told you about the Contractor Purchasing System Review (CPSR) process, and today we will (attempt to) convince you to care about this mega-compliance hurdle. If you want to read more about a CPSR, check out our white paper here.

There appears to be a trend in government evaluations looking for CPSR compliant contractors. CPSR compliance was an extra 500 points for the recent OASIS bid.  Many of our competitors will happily sell you a CPSR package without blinking at the cost or whether you actually needed it.

Who needs CPSR?
First, the main factor we tell our clients is to assess how much subcontracting work they do.  If your business weighs heavily on issuing a myriad of subcontracts or large procurements in support of your prime contract awards, then you have checked the first box to “needing” a CPSR compliance plan.  The remaining boxes are comprehensive.

Second, if a majority of your work is with the DoD, you may want to consider checking out DFARS 252. 252.244-7001, the regulatory birth of what a CPSR compliant system looks like. Finally, if your contract says you have to be CPSR compliant – we hope you already have systems in place to pass an audit before signing the dotted line.

Finally, most organizations do not like or want a CPSR compliance plan because of the heavy administrative burden it places on corporate processes.  Think about the last time you waited for a large GovCon to issue you a subcontract that was allegedly “on fire.”  In most cases, the subcontractor is issued a letter subcontract or works at-risk with an authorization to proceed (also part of the CPSR compliant program) before the “real” subcontract is issued.  This is because nearly all GovCons with CPSR compliance programs have to take several steps to coordinate awarding a procurement.  These steps were put in place to comply with CPSR requirements.

If we have not talked you out of it and you are ready to start the box-checking, administrative hurdles of CPSR land, consider an organization like BOOST that will tailor a compliance plan to fit your organization. We will not open a canned manual and serve it to you on a platter. We exist to add value. We can provide a customized CPSR plan; if you need it.