How to Manage a Pricing Schedule

Why a proper pricing proposal schedule matters.

You’ve been preparing and actively developing capture strategies for an upcoming bid and eagerly awaiting the draft or final RFP to drop. Finally, it drops! All proposal functions swing into action. The proposal manager’s first job is to develop a schedule and hold everyone accountable to it. Very seldom do we get a proposal manager to ask us for a “Pricing Schedule”. However, we always insist.  Here’s why:

Price/Cost volumes these days require a lot more facilitation and coordination with other volume leads than most people realize. 

  1. Basis of Estimates. Many cost volumes require a complete basis of estimates to be written and tied to the price tables. The question is “How is the pricing manager going to be able to do this without coordinating with the technical/management volume leads?” The Basis of Estimates (BOE) and technical schedules MUST be in sync with the cost volume timelines. We recommend that the pricing manager set this schedule. This includes giving out deadlines to the BOE writers and standardizing the BOE data calls.  This is usually a standard template organized to capture the various work breakdown structure (WBS) elements that feed the various Contract Line items (CLINS).  It is critical to understand that unless these estimates can be produced and relayed into the pricing tables in due time, the whole proposal WILL be at risk. It is never an easy task to take in estimates at the last minute and develop pricing tables and submit the proposal within a day. We recommend that the first cut of these estimates be provided to the pricing team right after red team is done on the technical volumes. Then a review and updates are to be provided after the final review of the technical volume.
  2. Subcontractors. If the RFP requires subcontractor rates and sealed bids, this must be coordinated in advance. This timeline must be set and adhered to early on. Not only for compliance, but also for finalizing rate strategies. Sealed bids also require a few extra days of preparation by your subcontractors. They need instructions and active management of this timeline. Often these rates also impact your small business plan numbers that must be submitted. All these pieces must be accurate and in sync by the time the cost volume is finalized. Pick up the phone and get everyone aligned, early.
  3. Management Review. Management reviews are a soap box item for many pricing managers. If you don’t give your pricing team enough time to cycle through the technical and rate updates, how do you expect them to be ready for a proper management review? If management has to make the final decisions on fee/profit, workshare, key personnel, and any other ways to finalize the price, they need the best models with the most accurate information in order to do so. Bad or incomplete technical estimates make for bad pricing models. Plain and simple. So, get them done in time! Organize and coordinate with the BOE writers, hold them accountable for the pricing timelines. You may also need to hold the management team accountable, so that they realize that any changes made at the last minute (yes Gold Team reviewers we’re looking at you), have cascading effects on the pricing volume.  All final decisions should be made during Green Team (which should happen a few days before Gold team, if possible).

We have seen many cost volumes developed in a rush in the final days of the proposal stage, and this puts the entire proposal at risk. Mitigate this by being aware of missed opportunities to refine/review a smartly developed and compliant proposal.  With good schedule management, the pricing volume can be a proper, accurate and complete document that will be a part of the winning proposal. Don’t make your pricing volume the reason for your proposal loss.

BOOST has pricing experts at the ready, but don’t wait until it’s too late. (See point b, above.) Get connected with us now so that when you need us you already have our number on speed dial. [email protected]

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